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when to take cbd tincture

(Courtesy of Populum)

Producers like Populum offer several ways to try CBD, including tried and tested tinctures sourced from Colorado-grown cannabis plants and made in the USA. Populum’s signature tincture is available in a variety of strengths, appropriate for dipping a toe into CBD or stepping up a dose to provide more effective relief.

As cannabis–based therapeutic products become more widely available and accepted, it’s natural to have questions. After all, a lot of the treatments on the market today weren’t around just a couple of years ago. While cannabinoids like CBD show a lot of promise in treating a host of conditions, it can be hard to know how to introduce them into an existing healthcare routine. Today, we explore the role CBD tinctures can play in your well-being.

What is a tincture?

Since the doses are relatively small, tinctures can be administered in a variety of ways. For patients looking to take their CBD with food, a dose of tincture can be mixed into a meal like soup or pasta. It can also be added easily to drinks like coffee and tea; an evening cup of chamomile paired with CBD tincture stands to be even more relaxing than usual.

Researchers around the world are investigating CBD’s potential for treating a wide variety of conditions. Near the top of the list is the promise it holds for pain relief. Numerous studies have found that CBD exhibits analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. These properties make it useful in the treatment of both acute pain—like muscle pulls—and chronic conditions such as arthritis.

Tinctures are produced by steeping cannabis flowers or isolates in a high-proof grain alcohol, then applying low heat for a significant span of time. This allows the active compounds in cannabis to infuse into the neutral spirit, much of which is then boiled off. The result is a potent liquid that delivers the effects of the cannabinoid molecules without any smoking or other form of combustion. In the growing consumer market, producers will often add carrier oils and other complementary ingredients, such as an orange oil to improve the taste of a tincture.

Tinctures can also be taken sublingually, or by applying them underneath the tongue. This method of delivering CBD tincture is already common in epilepsy treatments. Some research has found that this delivery method makes cannabinoids more easily and consistently available to the body than other oral alternatives.

Like many substances, there is no “proper dosage” of CBD that will work for everyone. Factors such as weight, metabolism, and genetics can influence how much CBD one person may choose to dose. That said, doses are usually measured in milligrams, and range from around 2.5mg all the way up to a few hundred milligrams per dose in clinical settings. Another factor to consider is the method of delivery. For example, it takes longer for oral CBD and edibles to be absorbed into the bloodstream due to the first-pass effect [4] , while sublingual administration takes a matter of minutes. CBD topicals, on the other hand, are applied directly to the skin, where the cannabinoid does not reach the bloodstream.

The goal of any exercise regime is to help the body function more efficiently during activity, while also reducing the amount of time it takes to recover afterwards. Does CBD have any potential here? Unfortunately, there are no direct links, but one can look to studies that report on CBD’s potential for anxiety [2] , sleep, inflammation [3] , and pain relief for further reading.

CBD coffee anyone? Unsurprisingly, many people prefer to take their CBD first thing in the morning, along with other supplements/medications and with their coffee and breakfast. But not everyone feels this way, and some would rather take CBD in the evening with dinner or right before bed. For the most part, it boils down to what time is easiest to remember and what time is the most beneficial for each person.

FACTORS THAT AFFECT TAKING CBD

Some people feel energised and alert when they take CBD, so taking it first thing in the morning makes sense. Others prefer to take it a few hours later when their afternoon exhaustion starts to kick in, giving them an extra boost to make it through the day. On the other hand, some people report feeling relaxed and sleepy after taking CBD, so in those cases, it would best be taken in the evening or before bedtime.

There is not a lot of comprehensive clinical research on the use of CBD in sport, but scientists and consumers are intrigued nonetheless. Given the role of the endocannabinoid system in mediating physiological functions [1] related to sleep, energy, coordination, metabolism, and much more, it’s worth exploring if exogenous cannabinoids like CBD can influence this system to benefit athletes. With the nervousness and restlessness experienced by many athletes before sporting events, and the sore muscles, inflammation, and exhaustion that follow, there is a widespread desire for any substance that may help with these issues.

Just like there is no perfect time of day to take CBD, there is no perfect schedule that works for everyone either. Some prefer to take it daily to perpetuate regular CBD levels in their bodies. Others prefer to take it as needed so it maintains its effectiveness in treating certain conditions. It all depends on your body and what you’re taking it for.

There are a few frequently asked questions by those who are new to cannabidiol (CBD), and even those who have been taking it for a little while already. Allow us to elaborate on when to take CBD, and how much.