Posted on

moms across america cbd oil

Proof of 501(c)(3) Status: EIN 30-0891447

Moms Across America is a 501c3 nonprofit organization with national networks, reaching millions of people every month, working to create healthy communities. Our international sister project, Mothers Across the World collaborates with many countries around the world to create healthy countries.

Disclaimers: Any statements about the products we offer have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The products we offer are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. There is no guarantee of specific results for the products we offer and the results can vary.

Get In Touch

Return Policy: You may return any item purchased from the Moms Across America Health Solutions Store for any reason within thirty (30) days of purchase. Unopened bottles can be shipped back and be refunded within 30 days. Opened bottles can be shipped back and given store credit. Shipping and handling charges are non-refundable. Moms Across America reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to reject returns that do not comply with these requirements. All other sales are final.

Questions? Email Here (Fastest Response Time) | Phone: 800-680-0183 | Press Inquiries? Email Here

Return Policy Summary: Applies to any item purchased from Moms Across America for any reason within thirty days of purchase. Shipping and handling charges are non-refundable. Moms Across America reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to reject returns that do not comply with these requirements.

Disclaimer Summary: Any statements about the products we offer have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The products we offer are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. There is no guarantee of specific results for the products we offer and the results can vary.

"Her last four months of her life she suffered," he told the tribal council, according to the Navajo Times. "She didn't have the medication to have a better part of life."

"I says, 'I'm going to stop you and what you're doing.' And you could see it in him. He was angry," she recalls.

It was part of a recent, surprising expansion of Chinese-American investment into the US cannabis industry. Investors sought to recoup losses from shuttered restaurants, spas and tourism businesses by ploughing millions into cannabis – all despite the fact that marijuana remains a social taboo in the Chinese immigrant community.

Meanwhile, her mugshot and those of her co-workers were all over the local news. They'd been charged with multiple felonies for trafficking, conspiracy and intent to distribute a controlled substance: high-grade marijuana.

What Xia did not know was that over the summer, about 30 minutes up the highway from the bright pink motel, a massive marijuana farming operation had sprung up in the tiny town of Shiprock on the Navajo Nation reservation. Hundreds of Asian migrant workers like herself had flocked there from all over the US to live and work on the farms, having lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

In a series of rooms on the first floor, Xia and her co-workers sat in chairs around heaps of plant material that were delivered by rental van in the night, trimming the "flowers" off the top. These were definitely not roses – the fan-leafed plants reminded Xia of àicǎo, or silvery wormwood, which the Chinese burn to ward off mosquitoes. The piles smelled so strongly that the odour hung around the motel like a cloud.

When Xia (not her real name) first heard about the job as a "flower cutter", she pictured roses.