Is It Illegal To Bring Weed Seeds On A Plane

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“Can I Carry Marijuana Seeds on a Flight?” And All the Other Travel Questions You Forgot to Ask What about flying with actual weed? Border crossings? How about seeds in checked luggage? In the Hello there fellow stoners! I read a few days ago (cant find the post back unfortunately) that somebody managed to travel with 20 – 30 seeds put in his… The circumstances were perfect: I was meeting up with one of my best friends from college…

“Can I Carry Marijuana Seeds on a Flight?” And All the Other Travel Questions You Forgot to Ask

What about flying with actual weed? Border crossings? How about seeds in checked luggage? In the time of broader legalization, it can be a huge help to know before you go.

So, the US, Canada, Uruguay, and The Netherlands all have pretty straight forward and stoner friendly recreational cannabis laws, but that doesn’t actually mean you should be climbing on a plane with fresh seeds or hash anytime soon. What about travelling with a few precious nugs? That also can be stickier than a strain of white widow.

For most cannabis related travel, it’s often best to stick to online retailers when it comes to toting marijuana seeds and paraphernalia. While it may not land you in cuffs, you are apt to lose the precious cargo that you’ve gone out of your way to acquire. When in doubt, mail it out- but in the meantime, here’s a handy guide for those prefer to travel high class.

Can You Bring Seeds on an Airplane? Best Not.

In fact, most seeds- whether they’re for weed or actual tomato plants, shouldn’t be brought across borders. Many countries have some pretty strict policies about vegetation from other countries crossing their borders. In most states of the US, possession of marijuana seeds isn’t actually illegal, nor is receiving them via your local postie. However, flying with these little guys is illegal.

Stories abound of clever little hiding hacks when it comes to the transport of seeds, rolling them up in socks, putting them inside trail mix, one user even commented that you can dip them in wax and glue them onto clothing… however, all of these transport “options” require you to remove seeds from their protective packaging. This can expose seeds to excess moisture, bacteria, or other bits that can inhibit future growth. With the long-time legitimacy of mail order programs, there’s really no reason to risk confiscation, fines, or the health of your seeds. So it’s best to think twice before trying to smuggle feminized seeds on a flight.

What About Pipes and Bongs? Go For It.

Smoking devices are another part of weed culture that can also easily be purchased online or mailed directly to your door. So if you’re worried about it, go ahead and slip it into the local post office before you travel. However, as long as there isn’t any weed in them, there’s no law that says you can’t travel with these devices- as long as it’s apparent that their intended use is for “tobacco products only”.

Despite the obvious overtones of bongs, pipes, and vaporizers being used for weed consumption; as long as there is no weed or resin to be found, it’s pretty hard to prove that’s your intention. When flying, TSA agents don’t look specifically for drug paraphernalia, but if they find it, it can be subject to further screening and scrutiny. So if you are packing glass, make sure that it’s not only squeaky clean, but you also pencil in some extra time for a possible chat with custom officials.

Flying High? All Signs Point to Yes.

If you’re in a weed friendly country and prefer a toke to settle the nerves of travel, go for it. As long as you’re not in possession of the devil’s lettuce, you can be mostly as high as you want in an airport. There are rules that restrict visibly intoxicated passengers from flying, but that rarely applies to someone with red eyes.

Better yet, consider toting an incognito edible along for the ride. Custom agents are not equipped to test foods that passengers bring with them, so as long as you don’t have a label on your brownie that says it’s pumped full of THC goodness, you should be alright. Edibles are ideal for flying because they usually take a little while to kick in. So if you’re not comfortable toting a cookie for your in flight entertainment, you can always eat before you hit the airport.

Can I Bring Weed on a Flight? Depends.

Flying with actual nuggets is a little less straightforward than some of the other recommendations we have for you. Flying with weed depends heavily on how much you’re carrying, where you’re at to begin with, and where you’re headed. Keep in mind, that in a large majority of the world, weed is still criminalized. So anytime you risk flying with marijuana, you risk jail time.

That being said, hopping an interprovincial flight in Canada with less than 30g isn’t really a problem. In fact, it’s totally legal as long as you’re of age and aren’t toking up on airport grounds. Running around LAX to SFO, or getting a flight across Oregon and you’re not bound to run into many troubles. As long as the amount of weed you have on you is negligible, and you don’t plan on crossing any non-weed friendly borders, you can generally get away with your pot unscathed. A few TSA agents out of California have even reported that their primary goal is “education” over incarceration. So in most recreationally legal states, you won’t be able to fly with it, but you’re unlikely to go to jail should you be caught packing.

Carrying seeds in your luggage on a plane

I read a few days ago (cant find the post back unfortunately) that somebody managed to travel with 20 – 30 seeds put in his jeans pockets, spread over the whole area of his suitcase.

I will also be doing the same very soon, and will travel while spreading them in a few pockets in my checked in luggage. My question is, do you keep the original packaging or are the seeds removed from vacuum packaging before being put in the pockets?

Advice is much appreciated and also if you have any other ideas on how to carry them would be great. I am only going to have 10-15 seeds maximum.

wuzrelygud
Well-Known Member

I recently went to the Caribbean and had no trouble with seeds in my carry on/backpack. They were not in any packaging though. I use one dram vials to store them and had them all together. Easily over 50 seeds.

Coming back to California, I was gifted at least 200+ seeds all from a 30+ year veteran grower. There was NO way I was going to leave them behind. Everything passed through TSA and xray with no problem both ways. Enjoy and keep hunting!!

Mr.Goodtimes
Well-Known Member

Could always go buy a pack of seeds from the store and trade them out. TSA don’t know what’s what and I doubt they smell as long as there’s no flowers mixed in. Or mail them.

SoMe_EfFin_MasS_HoLe
Well-Known Member

Do not put anything in your checked bag. If the search it they will take them. I’ve never traveled with beans, I fly all over with rolled joints in my carry on though. I’ve never had a problem ever. Tsa does not care for cannabis or beans. If you’re nervous put them inside a pen. Do not walk through the scanner with anything in your pockets let alone beans. You’re more apt to be stopped if you have things in your pockets. They have no idea what cannabis seeds are to apple seeds. If you do ever get stopped which you wont. Do not advertise that the are cannabis beans. Too them they could be apple seeds. You will be a ok my friend. Just do not act special when you’re going through security and you will be fine. If they do take the beans if traveling internationally it’s because you did not declare them in customs. You have to claim agricultural items through customs and usually they do not allow anything because they are afraid that it could bring unwanted bacteria etc into the country. Best bet is to put them in a carry on, act normal and keep a zip on the lip. You will be just fine. I’ve been bringing joints with me on flights both domestic and international for years, way before it was decriminalized or legalized in any state or other country. Never once even gotten a look let alone a search. Or just mail them back. It’s very simple. Plus if it’s a gift under 25 bucks you dont uave to pay import on the package. Put them in a box with a t shirt and send that bitch off and you will be fine!

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Heathen Raider
Well-Known Member
Northwood
Well-Known Member

Back in the early 1980s we took 15 grams of hash from Canada over the border by car to help us enjoy our canoe/camping tripping among the Georgian and Florida alligators. My brother hid it in his mouth (seriously). We hoped he wouldn’t be forced to swallow that huge chunk. Lol

Honestly now that I’m older I’d never risk it again. The backwards USA is very strict at the border. I have a career that 3 years in an American prison would seriously interfere with. Not to mention, my wife might be a bit freaked out over it. I’ve heard stories (yeah just stories) that people have lost their cars and freedom while having a few seeds in their ashtray in their car, or a dirty hash pipe hidden under the seat. When you visit backwards, socially undeveloped countries, your best bet is to obey their rules completely when you enter and while you’re there.

athomegrowing
Well-Known Member

Seeds aren’t illegal in the USA. If you’re flying in to the USA with seeds, you’re best off declaring them with customs. If you’re caught lying, there’s a penalty.

JPCyan
Well-Known Member

It is my understanding that viable cannabis seeds are NOT legal in the USA according to federal law.
I’d think declaring them at US customs would surely get them confiscated.
I have no personal experience with this, so I could be wrong.

This scheduling and definition seems to me absolutely ridiculous.
We cannot afford to let outdated and unjust laws dictate our freedoms and rights.

Lets all make sure we vote to change this any chance we get, as well as supporting our domestic seed producers and sellers here in the USA.

21 U.S.C. § 812 – U.S. Code – Unannotated Title 21. Food and Drugs § 812. Schedules of controlled substances
Schedule I – (C)- (10) Marihuana

21 U.S.C. § 802 – U.S. Code – Unannotated Title 21. Food and Drugs § 802. Definitions
(16) The term “marihuana” means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin. Such term does not include the mature stalks of such plant, fiber produced from such stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.

athomegrowing
Well-Known Member

In addition to hemp seed being legal, thc bearing seed for novelty, fishing, bait, animal food (non-germination) is legal.

JPCyan
Well-Known Member

Thanks for the link However these are the required provisions for said import. – from your link :
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates the importation of all seeds for planting to ensure safe agricultural trade. Under this authority, USDA is providing an alternative way for the safe importation of hemp seeds into the United States.
Hemp seeds can be imported into the United States from Canada if accompanied by either: 1.) a phytosanitary certification from Canada’s national plant protection organization to verify the origin of the seeds and confirm that no plant pests are detected; or 2.) a Federal Seed Analysis Certificate (SAC, PPQ Form 925) for hemp seeds grown in Canada.

Hemp seeds can be imported into the United States from other countries if accompanied by:
1.)a phytosanitary certificate from the exporting country’s national plant protection organization to verify the origin of the seeds and confirm that no plant pests are detected.
Hemp seed shipments may be inspected upon arrival at the first port of entry by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to ensure USDA regulations are met, including certification and freedom from plant pests.

Ive never received these certs ordering from Euro, UK or Canada.
Which is why you still get the green tape and seeds confiscated if CBP catches your order to the USA. And declaring it without proper paperwork at the airport customs would probably have the same results.

Have you a link to any more info from your comment? “In addition to hemp seed being legal, thc bearing seed for novelty, fishing, bait, animal food (non-germination) is legal.”
Thanks, appreciate the updated info.

What will TSA actually do with your weed if you’re traveling between two states where it’s legal?

FILE – A TSA employee searches the luggage of a United Airlines passenger at a security checkpoint at San Francisco International Airport on Aug. 10, 2006. TSA officers are required to report any suspected violations of law, including possession of marijuana and cannabis infused products. While they don’t search for marijuana or other illegal drugs, in the event they find an illegal substance, they will refer the matter to a police officer to enforce state law.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Show More Show Less

Denny sits for portrait during narcotics K-9 training at the Oakland International Airport on Thursday, May 11, 2017, in Oakland, Calif. The dogs and the handlers are training to spot many types of drugs, excluding marijuana. Amid legalization of marijuana, California’s current pot-sniffing K-9s face retirement.

Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 60 Bob Burns was the wit behind TSA’s Instagram account, before he passed away in 2018. He had been working with TSA since 2002 and was largely responsible for its social media presence. He posted photos of items that people tried to take through TSA checkpoints and failed miserably. Here are a number of recent ones, with his commentary. TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

7 of 60 TSA: “We need to talk about your flare. If you want to express yourself, this is the wrong kind of flare. You need flair. 37 pieces to be exact. … This flare gun was discovered in a carry-on bag at Honolulu (HNL). Flare guns are only permitted in checked bags without the flares.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

8 of 60 TSA: “9 out of 10 dentists recommend not hiding knives in toothbrush handles. This small pocketknife was discovered inside the taped handle of a toothbrush at Cleveland (CLE).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

10 of 60 TSA: “A Milwaukee (MKE) traveler found himself behind the eight ball after this concealed knife was discovered in his pool cue. All knives are prohibited, and concealed knives can lead to fines and arrest. #Scratch” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

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11 of 60 TSA: “Satan’s fidget spinner was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV). While normal #FidgetSpinners are permitted, this one is a weapon.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

13 of 60 TSA: “This traveler must have been under the impression that they’d have to blaze a trail to get to their gate at the Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

14 of 60 TSA: “I’m guessing you pull the pin to get it to walk? Inert grenades, real grenades or anything resembling a grenade is prohibited altogether from being brought on a plane. This grenade creature was discovered in a carry-on bag at Albuquerque (ABQ).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

16 of 60 TSA: “This gives ‘protection’ a whole new meaning. However, fines stink, and concealed items such as this knife in a deodorant container can lead to a fine and even an arrest. Don’t sweat it; just pack your knife in your checked bag. Also, stick deodorant (without a knife) is permitted in carry-on bags in any amount. It’s the liquid, gel and aerosol deodorant that must adhere to our liquid rules. This was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Bradley International Airport.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

17 of 60 TSA: “Foiled again! Some are under the impression that tinfoil can make things invisible. #Nope This knife was discovered in carry-on bag wrapped in foil at Houston (HOU).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

19 of 60 TSA: “‘Paging Davy Crocket to the security desk…’ This powder horn full of black powder was discovered in a checked bag at Boise (BOI). Black powder is an explosive and is strictly prohibited in both carry-on and checked bags.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

20 of 60 TSA: “We’ve got nothing against propane and propane accessories, but dang it, Bobby, you can’t pack two propane tanks in your checked bags. Propane has a propensity to explode and is prohibited all together from air travel. These were discovered at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

22 of 60 TSA: No. Unga bunga. Ooog smork nag gralk. (Please pack in checked bag.)” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

23 of 60 TSA: “This inert explosives training aid was brought through the checkpoint at Columbia (CAE). It wasn’t an in-house test; it was left in the carry-on bag of a traveling soldier who said he uses it as a training aid. It hasn’t been confirmed yet whether or not the X-ray operator needed a stiff drink after their shift . Even though it’s inert, it’s prohibited due to the fact that it looks so realistic.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

25 of 60 TSA: “Apparently, even rocket scientists have trouble packing their bags. This model rocket and engines were discovered recently in a checked bag at Greenville (PGV). All rocket engines are prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

26 of 60 TSA: “According to Wikipedia, the M224 60 mm Lightweight Mortar is a smooth bore, muzzle-loading, high-angle-of-fire weapon used for close-in support of ground troops. #ProTip – Even though they were unloaded, you can’t declare and check mortar tubes with your checked bags as you would with firearms. This one was discovered at the Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport in Guam (GUM).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

28 of 60 TSA: “This replica of @AMCTheWalkingDead’s “Lucille” was discovered recently in a carry-on bag at Atlanta (ATL). The barbed wire is actually made from rubber and the blood is fake (we hope). However, baseball bats are prohibited from carry-on bags and must be packed in checked luggage. #TWD #Negan We’re just glad Lucille wasn’t thirsty.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

29 of 60 TSA: “This gives ‘photo shoot’ an entirely different meaning. The camera was fine as a carry-on, but due to its similarity to a firearm, the handle/grip/trigger mechanism needed to be placed in a checked bag. This was discovered in a carry-on bag at LaGuardia (LGA).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

31 of 60 TSA: “While good food can be scarce on an aircraft, there’s no need to resort to the hunger games. This collapsible bow and arrows were discovered in a carry-on bag at Chicago O’Hare (ORD)” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

32 of 60 TSA: “This wasn’t prohibited, but when an actual lunar sample comes through a TSA checkpoint, you’ve got to mention it! @NASA Exhibits Specialist John Oldham was happy to let our Dane County (MSN) officers and fellow travelers take a closer look at the rock. The sample was collected during the #Apollo15 mission in 1971. It was the first mission to use the Lunar Roving Vehicle and 170 pounds of lunar surface material was collected and brought back to earth. #NASA rocks!” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

34 of 60 TSA: “This is an oldie but a goody. These shotgun shell Christmas lights were discovered back in December of 2012 in a carry-on bag at the Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR). All ammunition whether real or replica is prohibited from being transported in carry-on bags. This traveler wasn’t up to anything malicious, so they likely still made Santa’s nice list that year.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

35 of 60 TSA: “Newark (EWR) traveler attempted to take their hoe on the plane. If you need to travel with your gardening hoe, it’ll have to go in your checked bag.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

37 of 60 TSA: “A box of festively wrapped heroin was discovered in a checked bag at Los Angeles (LAX). This is an example of why our officers have to open gifts at times. They don’t enjoy it, but if there’s an anomaly inside, they have to check it out. We’re not looking for drugs, but in this case, it was nothing but drugs. When narcotics are discovered, our officers must notify the police.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

38 of 60 TSA “This pair of disgruntled throwing knives are throwin’ some serious shade at their owner for packing them in a carry-on bag. All knives must be packed in checked bags. These were discovered at Chicago O’Hare (ORD).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

40 of 60 TSA: “If you’re looking for that stunning shade of lipstick, this bejeweled stun gun disguised as lipstick might just do the trick. It’s sending shockwaves through the fashion community. It was discovered in a carry-on bag at Baltimore (BWI).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

41 of 60 TSA: “What you’ve got here is a one-pound container of gun powder. It was discovered in a traveler’s checked bag at Anchorage (ANC). Powdered Eggs?…Protien Powder?…Powdered Peanut Butter?…Gun Powder❌ #Nope” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

43 of 60 TSA: “Oooooh! Ahhhhh! It’s that time of year again where we remind everybody that fireworks and firecrackers are not allowed in carry-on or checked bags. These were all discovered recently at Houston (IAH) and Wichita (ICT). #Fireworks” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

44 of 60 TSA: “Elementary, my dear Watson. Some people need a little help when they’re on their feet, but in order to bring a mobility aid onto an aircraft, it cannot double as a deadly sword or immobilizing stun gun. Most people do not realize they have a sword in their cane. Best to check. From left to right, these sword canes and stun cane were discovered in traveler’s carry-on property at Ft. Lauderdale (FLL), Phoenix (PHX), and Salt Lake City (SLC).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

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46 of 60 TSA: “There’s a modern convenience in aircraft today called the overhead light that negates bringing fueled up lanterns on the aircraft. As you guessed, fueled up lanterns are not allowed in carry-on or checked bags. The only way this lantern would be permitted is if it was empty and had no traces of fuel at all. This was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on property at the San Diego International Airport (SAN).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

47 of 60 TSA: “This weapon will not only help you defend yourself against Orcs, but it also allows you to butter two slices of toast at the same time! This one was discovered in a carry-on bag at Chicago Midway (MDW). Please pack items such as this in your checked bags.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

49 of 60 TSA: “Why does this gigantic teddy bear look so sad? He was abandoned by his owners at LAX after the airline and TSA determined that he was just too big to be screened as a carry-on and taken on the plane. (UPDATE) After watching a YouTube video posted by the traveler, we’ve learned that he’s a popular YouTuber and this was a stunt to see if he could get the giant bear on the plane. . (He) had actually bought a ticket for the bear. After the airline and TSA decided the bear was too large, the airline offered to refund the ticket and the traveler was given the option of checking the bear as checked baggage. The traveler opted not to check the bear and left it behind.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

50 of 60 TSA: “Sometimes prohibited items write their own captions. Knives of any size are not allowed in carry-on bags. Please pack them in your checked bags. This knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at LaGuardia (LGA).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

52 of 60 TSA: I’m not sure why you’d bring this into the cabin of an aircraft. I mean… if there is a bear on the plane, he bought a ticket same as you. Would you want a bear to walk up to your seat and spray you with mace? Doubtful… Now if you’re out in the forest and he’s trying to steal your pic-a-nic basket, that’s a different story. All varieties of mace are not allowed in carry-on property. Mace can be packed in checked baggage, but bear mace canisters usually exceed the allowable volume of less than four ounces. it also must have less than a two percent active ingredient of either CS or CN. It’s best to purchase the bear mace at your destination. This canister of mace was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Seattle – Tacoma International Airport (SEA).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

53 of 60 TSA: “Holy cow! This cattle prod was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Chicago Midway (MDW) Airport. All shocking devices, especially cattle prods, are not allowed in carry-on bags. Please pack them in your checked bags with the batteries removed.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

TSA: “Billy the Kid would know better than to bring a knife to a gunfight. This gun knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Des Moines (DSM). All knives, even souvenir gun knives, are prohibited from being packed in carry-on bags. Please place them in checked bags. #TSAGoodCatch”

56 of 60 TSA: This should spark some conversation. It’s a mobility device. It’s a self-defense weapon. It’s not allowed in your carry-on property because it delivers 1,000,000 volts! Shocking, we know. This was discovered recently in a traveler’s carry-on property at the Kahului.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

58 of 60 TSA: “Just as Batman had to lecture Boy Wonder about fastening his bat-belt, we find ourselves once again reminding readers that Batarangs are not allowed in carry-on bags. These were discovered in a carry-on bag at the Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL). #BOOM #CLASH #KABAM” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

59 of 60 TSA: “Talk about throwing a wrench into your travel plans… This monkey/grasshopper wrench was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on bag at the Will Rogers World Airport (OKC) in Oklahoma. Tools over 7” must be packed in checked baggage.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

The circumstances were perfect: I was meeting up with one of my best friends from college for our first visit to Portland, Ore., and held the eager anticipation of what kind of antics we would get into during the exciting weekend ahead. Yet, preparing for this short vacation led me to Google something I’ve never searched for before:

Is it legal to bring marijuana on a plane from one state to another if it’s considered legal in both states?

Most websites’ answers were a resounding, seemingly obvious “no.” Go ahead, laugh at my naivety all you want. But after spending most of my life in the Midwest where recreational marijuana legalization seemed to be a far-off pipe dream, I honestly didn’t have a clue. Nor did I think it was a question I would ever have the opportunity to ask.

Sure, I knew I could just buy whatever I wanted when I arrived in Portland, but after spending money on plane tickets, a few nights’ stay in a hostel, and knowing I had other pending expenses ahead, I didn’t want to drop even more cash on something I already had – legally.

I even took to Reddit to ask people on r/trees (a go-to subreddit for everything related to cannabis with over 1.3 million subscribers). Most of the responses there ranged from caring – “I wouldn’t risk it, your weed will be waiting for you when you get back home :)” – to curt – “good luck getting caught and going to jail LOL.”

So, I went the safe route and left my edible gummies I was planning on bringing at my apartment and begrudgingly purchased more when I got to Portland. Still, I knew I wasn’t the only one questioning this legality. Whether you’re traveling to Portland like I was, or other big cities where recreational marijuana is legal – say, Seattle, Denver, Las Vegas, or Boston – it seems contradictory to have to leave your cannabis products at home when the law is giving you the green light in both your own city and destination.

That’s not to mention medical patients who need certain strains in order to combat chronic pain or alleviate symptoms of an illness. It was simple for me to just leave my weed at home, but what about patients for whom stopping usage can be detrimental to their health and well-being?

Long after I returned from the trip, I had the answer to my question, but still wanted the details. Are CBD products okay at airports? Is a TSA dog really going to sniff me out? Jenny L. Burke from the Transportation Security Administration provided me with some answers that might help you on your next journey.

The short answer:

As soon as you head into that airport, marijuana is considered a controlled substance and is therefore illegal from a federal perspective.

So, carrying a joint through the TSA checkpoint at a California airport is illegal?

Yes – but that doesn’t mean you’ll necessarily get in trouble if you get caught. TSA says that officers are required to report “any suspected violations of law, including possession of marijuana and cannabis infused products.” That being said, your weed likely isn’t their priority – the safety of everyone else is. TSA’s screening procedures are security-focused and designed to look for “potential threats” to aviation and passengers.

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