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is 1200 mg of cbd cream too much

However, if you are allergic to one of the ingredients, itching is possible. Studies have shown that allergies from cannabidiol are rare but be sure to study the ingredients on the products to make sure you are not allergic to any of the products content. Palm Organix™ CBD products are dietary supplements and not intended to treat, cure, or diagnose any ailments.

How much CBD to take? Now that CBD oil is Federally legal with the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill Act, discussing dosages with your doctor is the ideal first step to take in order to get the process started. However, if despite approving CBD as safe and discussing side effects, they do not offer a dosage recommendation, take the following recommendations as a rough guide, and decrease or increase the dose by 5mg as required until you find the correct dose that works for you.

However, at this time products that contains CBD derived from the cannabis plant have not been approved by the food and drug administration (FDA) for any of the above conditions and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Can CBD Oil Cause Itching?

If people have overwhelmingly severe symptoms, you should take a larger dose of per day for maximum effects.

Although not approved or evaluated by the food and drug administration, Broad Spectrum products are not psychoactive and the effects of it are sought our by people in an attempt to alleviate certain health problems. These are some conditions that people search most for:

Whether you would prefer to take your cannabidiol as an oil, gummy, softgel, or as a topical cream, we’ve got you covered.

While you can theoretically overdose on anything, CBD is exceptionally well tolerated by the human body and there are no known instances of anyone ever overdosing on CBD. Studies have proven that even doses of 1500 mg per day are well tolerated.

Like Capano explained above, the perfect dose varies from person to person. It also depends on a few things—the first being whether you’re using an isolate or full-spectrum product. Isolate products are pure CBD while full-spectrum products contain multiple cannabidinoids and oils, vitamins, and more natural compounds. “With full-spectrum products, you need a lower dose—and that might prevent drug interactions and will be easier on your liver,” says Capano.

Get ready to kiss that nagging knee or back pain goodbye. Along with improvements in sleep and mood, chronic aches are the main reason people are turning to CBD. That’s because cannabidiol is an anti-inflammatory agent. In other words, it helps reduce the inflammation causing the pain, rather than reducing your perception of pain. “Percocet will just make you feel like you don’t have pain while CBD will get at the root cause,” explains Capano. CBD also helps nix pain because it’s an antioxidant itself, increases our own natural antioxidants, and works on serotonin receptors.

How much CBD should I use?

“They both are relatively safe, but CBD is arguably safer for several reasons,” she says. For one, it won’t affect your motor skills or cognition, so you can use CBD and still drive your car or get through a day at the office without causing coworkers to raise an eyebrow. Also, while the THC in a joint, vape pen, or gummy might leave you feeling paranoid, CBD is actually an anxiolytic (meaning it nixes anxiety) and anti-psychotic.

With a tincture, Capano recommends starting with 10mg of active cannabinoids (this should be on the label). In some products, 10mg is a few drops; in others, it’s a whole milliliter. Put the oil under your tongue and hold it there (no swallowing!) until it absorbs. If taking orally (e.g., popping a pill), you’re going to need more, says Capano, because you lose a bit of the active ingredients to something called first-pass-metabolism by the liver. A pill with 15 or 20 mg of CBD might be comparable to 10 mg of a tincture. “Also, keep in mind that oral ingestion results in a delayed onset,” she says, “so wait an hour or two before adding anymore, especially if there’s THC in there.”

The real concern when it comes to side effects, says Capano, is whether or not the CBD in your medicine cabinet is legitimate. You first need to find out if it’s even real CBD, as synthetic can be dangerous. Then look into how the plants are grown, how the product is manufactured, and what quality-assurance tests the brand conducts to ensure safety and the elimination of pesticides, chemicals, microbes, and molds. “It’s an unregulated industry, and there’s a lot of great branding and marketing out there, but unfortunately transparency is rare and not knowing what you’re getting is common,” warns Capano. “Usually that risk just means wasting your money, but it could be harmful, if there are dangerous chemicals in there, for example.” Contact the company with these questions; any reputable brand will be willing to provide customers with all these details.