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does cbd cream interact with other medications

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A lot of people think of metabolism in terms of how easily or slowly they gain and lose weight, often claiming to have a “fast” or “slow” metabolism. In scientific terms, this is what is known as the basal metabolic rate, or the amount of calories an individual requires in order to sustain normal body functions while at rest.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of over a 100 different types of a specific kind of compound called phytocannabinoids found in the Cannabis sativa plant.

Key Takeaways

For instance, any therapeutic compound that is metabolized by the CYP system has the potential of being affected by CBD. One indication that your medicine might be metabolized by the CYP system is if your pharmacist told you not to eat grapefruit, or watercress or use St. John’s Wort or goldenseal supplements. However, this is by no means a solid test and you should always check with your pharmacist of doctor first (more on that later).

If this processing is dependent on the CYP system, then inhibitors can cause an insufficient amount of the active drug compound to be available in the body, which can result in the desired therapeutic effect not being reached.

As mentioned, and contrary to popular belief and anecdotal evidence, CBD is not a biologically inert compound. Rather, CBD has a complex pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile similar to any other medication, and has the potential to interact with other medications and medical conditions.

It is estimated that the CYP system is responsible for metabolizing over 60% percent of any drug that has been consumed. And interestingly, pharmaceutical researchers and doctors also use cytochrome P450 system to understand, calculate and predict drug dosages effects as well as its potential side effects.

Dr. McIntrye, who co-authored a 2018 study that concluded that healthcare providers need more information about drug-drug interactions with CBD and psychotropic medication, says much of the information out there is confusing and contradictory. Therefore, he echoes Dr. Alloway’s statement that it is absolutely prudent that patients clear the use of CBD with their doctor before giving it a go.

And shoppers are buying it, so to speak—one recent report indicated that CBD sales are expected to hit $16 billion by 2026, up from just over $1 billion in 2018. But what exactly is CBD, and is it safe for people who are using prescription medications? Before using it, it’s important to learn about the potential CBD drug interactions.

If you’ve visited a store that sells health and beauty products lately, you may have noticed that products containing CBD, or cannabidiol, seem to be all the rage. Oil, chocolate, supplements, even carbonated beverages, are filling up shelves—enticing shoppers with claims that using one of these products will cure insomnia, alleviate anxiety, reduce inflammation, or treat PTSD.

Does CBD interact with medications?

As for other drugs, well, most haven’t been studied yet. There is preliminary evidence that CBD could have a similar effect to grapefruit juice, impairing how your body metabolizes drugs, and raising serum levels of those medications in your body. And, because cytochrome P450 is responsible for the metabolism of numerous medications , proceed with caution before mixing any prescription pharmaceutical with CBD, Dr. Alloway says.

“There is no role right now for CBD in managing mental disorders that I [treat], such as depression, bipolar disorder … anxiety and ADHD,” he says. “We just don’t have the evidence that supports [it].”

Are the concentrations in commercially available CBD high enough to cause this interaction? The evidence doesn’t really say one way or another. Dr. Alloway’s research involved a high dosage of CBD that wouldn’t be found in a retail product. However, it “highlights that a drug interaction is there,” she says. Plus, tacrolimus is metabolized in the body by a group of enzymes called cytochrome P450 and CBD is a known inhibitor of this process. What does that mean? If CBD inhibits the metabolism of tacrolimus, the patient can end up with too-high levels of tacrolimus in the body. In light of this, she urges anyone taking tacrolimus to speak with their transplant team before using CBD. Don’t get your hopes up, though—using herbal remedies, particularly those with potential interactions, is generally frowned upon by doctors looking after transplant recipients (including Dr. Alloway).

“Herbal products are drugs,” says Rita Alloway, Pharm.D. , research professor of nephrology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. “Just because [something] is herbal … doesn’t mean it can’t interact with any of the pharmaceutically manufactured drugs that you may be taking.”