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What’s the evidence it works? And what do experts recommend? Until recently, there’s been little research and even less guidance for people (or their doctors) interested in CBD products that are now increasingly legal and widely promoted.

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As with any treatment, there can be downsides. CBD is generally considered safe; however, it can still cause lightheadedness, sleepiness, dry mouth, and rarely, liver problems. There may be uncertainty about the potency or purity of CBD products (since they are not regulated as prescription medications are), and CBD can interact with other medications. For pregnant women, concern has been raised about a possible link between inhaled cannabis and lower-birthweight babies; it’s not clear if this applies to CBD. Some pain specialists have concerns that CBD may upset the body’s natural system of pain regulation, leading to tolerance (so that higher doses are needed for the same effect), though the potential for addiction is generally considered to be low.

Until recently, little guidance has been available for people with arthritis pain who were interested in CBD treatment. Depending on availability and interest, patients and their doctors had to decide on their own whether CBD was a reasonable option in each specific case. To a large degree that’s still true, but some guidelines have been published. Here’s one set of guidelines for people pursuing treatment with CBD that I find quite reasonable (based on recommendations from the Arthritis Foundation and a recent commentary published in the medical journal Arthritis Care & Research):

Of course, there is anecdotal evidence and testimonials galore, including reports of dramatic improvement by people who tried CBD in its various forms (including capsule, liquid, topical, and spray) for their pain. But we are still waiting for well-designed, scientifically valid, and rigorous clinical trials (such as this one in progress) that are so badly needed to answer the question of just how helpful CBD may be to people with chronic arthritis pain.

In addition, individuals experience pain and respond to treatment in different ways. As a result, it’s highly unlikely that there is a single CBD-containing product that works for all people with all types of arthritis.

When using CBD gummies for the first time, you’ll need to dial-in the dose for your body individually. Start with a small dose (half a gummy, or around 10 mg), and build up over time.

Both options have a medley of fruity flavors and are infused in high-grade purified cannabidiol.

Everybody perceives pain differently. One person may describe their pain as 10/10 – while another person with the exact same condition reports their pain as 6/10. There are dozens of factors that can affect how we perceive pain.

How to Get the Most from CBD Gummies for Pain

THC stands for tetrahydrocannabinol. It’s the primary psychoactive ingredient in the marijuana plant. While most CBD products don’t contain enough THC to make you feel high — even trace amounts of this cannabinoid could trigger a fail on an upcoming drug test.

How CBD Blocks Pain

CBD-infused gummies provide potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and muscle-relaxant properties — yet offer little to no side effects.