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cbd oil and liver disease in dogs

CBD is not tried and true like traditional medications. The science is still new regarding it, and while it does show great promise and even veterinarians consider it a worthy secondary or primary treatment in many cases, you don’t want to rule out the possibility that another route may prove necessary. CBD is best used when other treatments are proven ineffective, the side effects of a traditional treatment are threatening its success, or a disease has gone too far to be treated with conventional means.

Dogs are more likely to develop liver damage as they age. Like any other organ, it both starts to function less optimally over time and has had time to suffer from damaging things that have happened to it.

Both of these types of CBD are quite good, but you should know which one you are buying because some people find that one works better than the other for their unique situation and you need to know which ones does work for your dog so you can buy it again.

Using CBD Oil

The first stage is liver damage and it involves inflammation. The liver is being attacked and is trying to heal itself.

CBD is not a healthy hammer, whopping a dog’s body with feel good benefits and then leaving them to crash. It manages and regulates functions that help the dog’s body maintain its own health.

Medications containing the most chemicals that may eventually damage the liver are flea and tick, deworming, vaccinations, and painkilling medications.

Choose manufacturers who say they used the CO2 extraction method as this is the safest and purest one.

Epidiolex is made by a pharmaceutical company called GW Pharmaceuticals, who has taken great pains to corner the market on cannabis. In fact, they routinely lobby for stricter regulations that only they can meet, for example, they have pushed for legislation making it harder for medical cannabis companies to be marketed unless FDA approved. So, pushing researchers to find an issue with liver toxicity can only serve to benefit them by allowing them to be the only company able to provide a product that potentially will NOT elevate enzymes when used as directed. By raising consumer skepticism and fear of cannabis, they can effectively corner the market.

The original study that alleged that CBD raised liver enzymes was published in a medical journal called Molecules, and was conducted by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Researchers looked at the effect of various dosage amounts on mice, using the recommended dosage amount for humans to scale. The study found that mice who received higher doses of CBD showed liver damage within 24 hours, with 75 percent on the brink of death in a matter of days. Scary stuff, right?

Studies have shown that CBD is actually safer for dogs than many prescription medications, like phenobarbital. In a study conducted by Colorado State University, 10 mg/kg/day or 20mg/kg/day was administered to dogs for 6 days. CBD was tolerated in the study population. There was an elevation in serum ALP in 36 percent of patients, and all other blood parameters were normal – nothing more than a reaction to normal over the counter medications. Six of the 30 dogs had vomiting, and all had mild diarrhea. 11 of 30 dogs experienced erythema of pinna and 10 of 30 dogs experienced nasal and ocular discharge. These effects were significantly safer than many side effects of both over the counter and prescription medications.

Why would the makers of Epidiolex want negative results?

To conduct the experiment, scientists fed mice single doses of CBD ranging from “low” at 246 mg/kg up to a mega-dose of 2460 mg/kg CBD. To break it down, for every kilogram of body weight, they gave the mice about 2.5 grams of CBD. This dose is over ten times the normal dose – which is unreasonably high, and which caused the study to be skewed away from reasonable use from the start. The study’s abstract also presents math that is impossible. Since only 6 mice were studied, 75 percent of mice would have been 4.5, leaving only 1.5 mice to survive. Perhaps it is the animal lover in me, but I do hope that whichever mouse was able to survive in two halves is living a healthy life to this day, but something tells me that this figure is simply incorrect.

Dr. Richter also notes that most medications, including Tylenol, raise liver enzymes, and when given extremely high doses of these common medications (or small doses over long periods of time) liver damage can occur. However, research has not shown that life-long use of cannabis has an adverse effect on the liver. In fact, it has shown the opposite, because elevated liver enzymes cease as soon as cannabis leaves the system (unlike dangerous pharmaceuticals) and CBD can be tolerated in dogs at very high dosages without fatal side effects.

One of the questions my team and I are asked often is whether CBD is safe and if it has any negative effects on pets. Because of a recent study, a stern warning from the FDA, and negative coverage in mainstream media outlets, the question has been posed: does cannabidiol, or CBD, elevate liver enzymes to dangerous levels? To find out the truth, I consulted the country’s top holistic veterinarians and did a little digging to explain what this means.

Full spectrum hemp extract (CBD) has several positive benefits for dogs. Full spectrum hemp extract (CBD) has been proven to shorten the duration and frequency of seizures, reduce inflammation and pain associated with arthritis and pancreatitis, treat allergies, prevent anxiety, maintain optimal blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes, alleviate symptoms of Cushing’s Disease and other autoimmune diseases, and even shrink tumors (including skin tumors). Research is continually being conducted to share the benefits of CBD for both humans and their canine companions. To stay up to date with all of the latest studies, visit www.cbddoghealth.com/studies/.