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cbd oil and kidney stones

Officially known as cannabidiol, CBD is a chemical compound found in the cannabis plant, both in hemp and marijuana strains. CBD comes from a larger group of naturally occurring chemicals in the cannabis plant referred to as cannabinoids.

But, today, our question is: can CBD help with kidney stones? Now, there are no studies directly pertaining to this subject, but we can make an informed decision based on information from other studies. So let’s take a look at what exactly kidney stones are and how you might identify them.

What Is CBD?

The pain of kidney stones may not be isolated. It can radiate into your lower abdomen and fluctuate with intensity over time. You may also experience increased pain or burning when urinating.

And that’s not all: CBD affects more than 60 different pathways in your brain, influencing your serotonin reception, immune system function, and a lot more. This is why we’re constantly discovering new ways that CBD can impact our lives.

The good news is that, if you use a hemp-extract CBD, it will only contain trace amounts of THC. This means that you can enjoy the cannabinoid’s potential benefits without the fear of intoxication.

Some of the options in this area include CBD oil and hemp oil, tinctures, sprays, and medical marijuana. It is important to note that medical marijuana also contains THC, so this is something to keep in mind if you want a product that does not offer a psychoactive effect.

However, since cannabis use is now becoming more widely accepted for medical purposes versus strictly for recreational use, Medscape goes on to say that more studies need to be conducted in this area to determine proper dosing for kidney stones and other chronic kidney diseases specifically.

In the United States, approximately 11 percent of all men and 6 percent of women will experience kidney stones at some point in their lives according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDKD). [1]

Choosing CBD Product Type

Based on these minerals, the four types of kidney stones are:

Like with any other health supplement, proper dosing is important when it comes to safe and effective pain management for kidney stones.

Another study took an in-depth look at the renal benefits CBD can provide chemotherapy patients, a demographic which is more susceptible to developing toxicity in the kidneys. [6]

All four of these types of kidney stones can cause severe pain, particularly if they get stuck in the urinary tract and are unable to pass on their own.

Finally, excretion of THC, mostly as acidic metabolites, occurs predominantly via feces (65%-80%) over days to weeks as a result of significant enterohepatic recirculation and high protein binding. 6 Only 20% to 35% of THC is excreted through the urine; its high lipophilicity leads to high tubular reabsorption and low renal excretion of the unchanged drug. 6,42 The pharmacokinetics of other cannabinoids resemble THC in that there is a large volume of distribution and high protein binding; as a result, they are unlikely to be effectively removed by conventional hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. 43 As THC and CBD elimination is primarily achieved through the fecal route with minimal renal excretion, renal dose adjustment is unnecessary for the 2 most abundant cannabinoids in cannabis. Furthermore, in spite of the paucity of pharmacokinetic data of other cannabinoids and their metabolites, the clinical significance of potential accumulation in renal impairment is low given their relative trace amounts in nonsynthetic cannabis. It is unclear whether other compounds, chemical contaminants, or adulterants, particularly in recreational cannabis, may pose nephrotoxic risks. Until clinical trials of cannabis are conducted in severe renal impairment, close monitoring is still highly warranted in CKD.

As a manifestation of uremic syndrome, anorexia progressively leads to malnutrition, cachexia, and poor QOL toward later stages of CKD. The cause of uremic anorexia is multifaceted and arises from a combination of increased anorexigenic compounds and cytokines such as TNF-alpha, pro-inflammatory substances, and disturbances in amino acid concentrations in the central nervous system, which triggers the synthesis of serotonin, an appetite suppressant. 72 THC induces appetite by activating CB1 receptors centrally in the hypothalamic region responsible for homeostatic regulation of feeding and peripherally to signal the nutritional state of the gut and lipogenesis. 73,74

Constatations:

Note. CKD = chronic kidney disease; COPD = chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Jusqu’à ce que d’autres études soient menées, l’utilisation des cannabinoïdes non synthétiques chez les patients atteints d’IRC devrait se limiter au soulagement des douleurs neuropathiques chroniques. Les cliniciens doivent comprendre que les cannabinoïdes non synthétiques, particulièrement lorsqu’ils sont inhalés, comportent des risques significatifs pour la santé et que ceux-ci doivent être examinés avec prudence en regard des bienfaits thérapeutiques limités du cannabis chez les patients atteints d’IRC.

The focus of this article has been on nonsynthetic cannabis as opposed to synthetic cannabinoids such as dronabinol and nabilone, as the effects of isolated cannabinoids can be different from that produced by the whole plant. However, there are significant methodological challenges of studying nonsynthetic cannabis: standardization of drug delivery and exposure is poor due to the diversity of cannabis strains and their administration routes. Aside from nabiximols, which is available as a fixed dose of THC:CBD as an oromucosal spray, there is high variability in cannabis preparations in literature, which is further complicated by a lack of reporting of cannabis strains used. For studies that examine whole plant cannabis, dosage is frequently reported only based on proportion of THC, which limits guidance to the different effects of cannabis strains and hybridized breeds available. Variation in smoking techniques, such as depth and frequency of inhalation, can also lead to inconsistent drug delivery to study participants. Moreover, it is unclear whether administration methods such as vaporization, which spares the production of toxic combustion compounds by heating cannabinoids at a lower temperature, produce comparable efficacy and bioavailability of cannabinoids as smoking. Implementation of an effective placebo is also a significant barrier to conducting quality cannabis trials. Despite of double blinding of RCTs, psychotropic effects of THC are difficult to mask, particularly among experienced cannabis users; hence, risk for detection and performance bias is often high. The significant increase in THC potency from 3% to 12% since 1980s to 2012 in confiscated marijuana suggests that relevance of earlier studies with low potency cannabis may be limited, particularly with respect to long-term adverse effects. 116