Posted on

cbd for life tincture reviews

We purchased this CBD product and tested it at independent testing facilities to measure levels of CBD, THC, and other cannabinoids and compare the results to the manufacturer's claims. Here are the results. (Learn more about our review process.)

Total mg Unspecified

Test Results

* Products tested prior to 2020 were sent to only one independent testing facility.

The unadulterated test results on this page come directly from these certificates of analysis from two independent labs, which we pay directly. These are two independent lab tests of one product, at one point in time. We do not guarantee that all products or labs will produce the same results. Lab results may differ based on the different methodologies of testing used by each lab or inconsistencies in the product. Added ingredients may affect lab results. Volume of creams and edibles may change due to factors such as temperature, and this may impact lab results. Learn more about our review process.

There are no Certificates of Analysis or mention of third party lab testing on the CBD For Life website, but they do encourage consumers to reach out to them if they have questions about their products, including their test results or sourcing methods.

These hemp tinctures feature a unique blend of both CBD isolate and phytocannabinoid rich CBD oil.

Highlights ?

CBD For Life products are made in the U.S.A. and their manufacturing headquarters are located in New Jersey, but it’s unclear exactly where their hemp extract originates from.

CBD For Life has a lot to choose from, especially when it comes to unique beauty products that you won’t easily find elsewhere. Their CBD-infused shampoo, conditioner, bath bombs, and soaps are hard to come by, and all of they are all affordably priced below $35.00. Although, this brand doesn’t offer a lot of other delivery methods apart from topical application, except for their CBD tinctures and oral spray.

Starting at $43.50

In the UK, while almost all cannabinoids are controlled substances under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, CBD is not. Bulgaria was the first in Europe and the United Kingdom is also leading the way, having just started selling CBD products en masse in popular health chain Holland & Barrett. The products must have less than 0.2% of THC in them in order to be sold, according to the Home Office. In other words, CBD products are allowed to contain miniscule traces of THC, but not so much that it is noticeable by users.

“There are over a quarter of a million people using CBD products in the UK right now. We know from more developed markets in US and Canada that people are typically using CBD to help with pain, anxiety and insomnia.” He references the brand’s “EASE, CALM and REST ranges, which combine CBD with other botanical ingredients that are well known to help in these areas.”

Does it actually work?

According to one report carried out in Australia, industrial hemp is considered as a crop that can “contribute significantly” to the government’s aim to “reduce global atmospheric Carbon Dioxide.”

As of recently, the mainstream media is speculating as to whether the benefits of CBD are “overstated” and one Opinion Piece in The Guardian called CBD a “scam” in which consumers are being “conned”. Alongside the lack of research available, much of the criticism is down to the fact that CBD is now advertised as being in a whole host of products where exact amounts, quality and sourcing are not transparent.

It is perhaps no surprise that this alleged “wonder drug” originates from hemp, as the plant has been used by humans for centuries, for numerous different functions. It is used in many commercial and industrial products including rope, textiles, clothing and shoes. Hemp oil is also used in food and beauty products, hailing from the seeds of the plant. CBD oil is extracted from the stalk, stems, leaves and flowers.